Mütter Museum

Last Wednesday PRIED went on an expeditionary learning trip to the Mütter Museum. We started the trip by walking around in the museum. We saw different diseases, conjoined twins and small babies who died from various complications. After that we took a class where we learned how to tell what people’s genders are and if they are African, American, or Asian from their skulls. I thought the class we took was really cool and interesting, and it was a great learning experience.

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Mütter Museum

On Wednesday our class took a trip to the Mütter Museum in Philadelphia. At the museum we saw many fascinating, and sometimes disturbing, exhibits. These exhibits range from pathological specimens and wax models to old surgical implements and objects removed from people. The museum also had a variety of medical oddities one of which is the model of Chang and Eng who were conjoined twins born in modern day Thailand in 1811. During their life they married sisters and had a total of 21 children before dying in 1874. After we looked around the museum we had a class about forensic anthropology and bone identification and classification. I really enjoyed our trip to the Mütter Museum and learned a ton.

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Mütter Museum

This last Wednesday, the last day before break started, we went on a science field trip to the Mütter Museum. This is a museum where they have things relating to the human body and a lot of different medical procedures or problems. While there were definitely a lot of things that peaked my interest and that I enjoyed a lot, there were a lot of things that grossed me out a lot. I personally don’t like to see shrunken heads or persevered organs. On the bright side, I still learned a lot of things from the museum and the class that we had. One of my favorite things in the museum was a booth that showed you getting your arm amputated. It did this by using a mirror and a screen to cover up your arm and project a fake one over it. By doing this you were able to see yourself in the mirror and a fake arm on a screen covering your real one. It showed the process of being in a war, having your arm shot, having it get infected, and having to get it amputated and learning to live with only one arm. I think this was a great exhibit to look at because this is an actual thing that people go through, and you are able to experience a simulation of that.
We also got to go to a class on how to identify bones. During this class we were shown a presentation and different parts of a skeleton and how to use these parts to identify different things. Just by looking at the skull you’re are able to identify the age, gender, and race of the person. I think it’s absolutely amazing that people are able to tell that just by looking at the skull, and are able to tell so much more by looking at a full skeleton.
I think that overall this was a great experience, and I learned a lot.

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NYC 9/11 Memorial and Museum

We recently went on a field trip to New York. There we visited the 9/11 Memorial Museum. We saw the “footprints” of the old twin towers, along with the two new towers. Inside the museum we saw photos of the first responders who helped find people after the attack. We learned that only one column had survived the attack and that it was the last column still standing. That column became a memorial and was a place for family of the people who died in the attacks to honor them. It is now in the 9/11 museum. We also saw a huge wall filled with squares of painted blue paper. We learned that each square represents a single person that died as a result of 9/11. We saw a few other artifacts in the museum too. Something that I have learned from this experience is the importance of a memorial because we have to remember what happened that day and the days that followed it.

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New York

This week we went to New York. In New York we took a tour of Wall Street. We went to a church where Alexander Hamilton, his wife, and their child were buried. We went there because he was a huge part of the creation of America’s financial system. After going to Hamilton’s grave, we went to the bull and saw a building that once served as George Washington’s home. We saw the statue of the bull which represents when the stocks are up. After looking at the bull, we went to Wall Street where stocks were being traded. We couldn’t go into the building because no one  is allowed in the building except for the people who work there. The trip to New York was fun and hopefully we can go back and learn more about these things.   

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New York Trip

This past Monday we visited NYC to take a tour of Wall Street and visit the 9/11 Memorial Museum. It started off as a windy cold day when we got on the bus, just the kind of day that screamed at you “It’s freezing in New York!”, but we ventured on anyway and had a great time! First, we visited the 9/11 Memorial Museum and got to take a look at a lot of the artwork created to remember the tragic 9/11. First, we saw photographs. This photography showed  volunteers, firemen, and police just starting to clean up the rubble at ground zero. You could tell from every single photo that they were overwhelmed and didn’t even know where to start. Just trying to imagine what it must have been like for them is hard. I feel for all the firemen who went into the burning building risking their lives for so many people trapped inside, those who witnessed it in New York, and families whose loved ones were lost in this event. It really was one of the darkest days in American history, but perhaps we remember it because of the day after, September 12th. This day, all of America came together and came together stronger than they were on September 10th. Volunteers all the way from California flew in just to lend a hand in the cleanup process. It’s really incredible to hear that people came so far to help their fellow Americans. The second artifact we saw was a piece of art called  “Trying To Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning”. This piece was made of one square for each of the victims that died. These squares were each painted in a different shade of blue that represents the blue color of the sky that day. It also represents each individual victim’s own uniqueness since each square is a slightly different shade of blue. I thought this was a simple, but beautiful, way to represent the victims. The next stop was an artifact that people had turned into a memorial by adhering pictures, flowers, and all the things you would see at a cemetery to it. A lot of people felt they had to do this because many didn’t have a cemetery to go to since many human remains were never found. The last piece was a small collection of art from people from all across the world. They painted their thoughts and feelings, they painted what happened, and they painted the hope for the future. They were all beautiful and very different from each other, but yet they were all about the same thing, which is the part that was so incredible to me. After we were finished, we each got to make our own blue square with a small drawing on it to remember 9/11 in our own way. Overall, I loved this museum, and I would love to go back! Afterwards, we took a tour of Wall Street. We didn’t actually get to into the building where people trade stocks, but we got to see the building, talk about what goes on inside, and go to other historic financial monuments including Alexander Hamilton and Eliza Schuyler graves! This was probably my favorite part. It was crazy to imagine that George Washington and Alexander Hamilton actually lived in New York at some point in their lives. Also being a huge fan of Hamilton the musial made it all that much better! At the end of the day we headed back to our bus on the metro and rode a Greyhound bus all the way back to Delaware. I think this was a great field trip. I’ve always loved New York, and I love every opportunity I get to visit this huge city.

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New York

Last Monday, we went on an amazing trip to New York. After getting through some tough transportation issues, we went to the 9/11 Memorial Museum. We were going on a class tour, so we were able to do some activities that may not have been available to us otherwise. First, we went to classroom and watched a short summary about what happened on 9/11. Then, we went out into the museum. While looking around the museum, we stopped at specific places to write or draw on a graphic organizer. One of my favorite and most memorable spots was the last pillar. This was the last thing that was pulled out of the wreckage of the World Trade Centers. As other things were being cleaned out around it, there were messages graffitied on it, pictures taped to it, and even bouquets of flowers attached to it. One of the pictures on the pillar particularly caught my attention. This was a picture of a victim of the attack that was duct taped on the pillar. What made me so interested in it was that there were messages written on the duct tape in permanent marker. I couldn’t read most of them, but the one that stood out the most was a small “xoxo” in the bottom right corner. This just seemed like such a sweet gesture to me, and I think it’s beautiful that someone did this. It’s amazing to me how in such a hard time for the country, everyone was able to come together and help after this attack.

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New York Trip

We traveled to New York City on 11/21/16.  The first thing we did was go to the 9/11 memorial and museum. We spent some time outside next to the pools, and then we went inside the museum. Inside the museum we first went inside a classroom and learned some background information about the 911 attacks. Then we explored the museum by looking at four different artifacts and filling out a graphic organizer to help gather our thoughts. We had to fill out squares on a sheet of paper about materials in the museum.  When we were finished at the museum we had a Wall Street walking tour.  We walked from the museum to Wall Street.  On the tour we saw the New York Stock Exchange, the bull, and  Alexander Hamilton’s grave.

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Math League

Last week, we started preparing for math league. Math league is a competition where groups from schools in a certain area come together and do math. At each monthly meet, students are given seven math problem to complete in 3-4 minutes. Every question they get right is tallied and counted for the school. I think math league is very interesting because even the people who are really good at math are challenged. I think this also shows how hard it is to do math league because every one is given the same problems, regardless of their math level. I think this also makes it a lot more fun because you are able to try new things that you might not know how to do yet. This also helps me to internalize many math concepts!

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World Music

This week was our second week of our world music projects. Our world music projects are just one of the projects we will be doing in music this year. These projects give us an opportunity to research music from all around the world and share what we find with our classmates. Two weeks ago we each researched a different instrument from a different country in Africa. When I think of African music, I think of that very distinct sound that typically focusses on percussion instruments, and the fun up beat sound of the striking, shaking and scaping of instruments. However, when researching my country, I was surprised to find a wide variety of string instruments as well. My country was Ethiopia, and the music there is so beautiful, fun, and interesting. It’s really got a spectacular sound. Everything from their unique instruments, to their bouncy (at least I would describe them as bouncy) vocal techniques are great. They’re music is just so fun. Anyhow, the specific instrument I researched was the masenqo which is indeed a string instrument. The masenqo is basically the Ethiopian version of a violin or fiddle, but it only has one string! My mind was completely blown by this, considering the fact that the people who play it can create so many different notes. The skill it must take to play this instrument must be incredibly difficult to master, but the outcome is wonderful.

This past week we researched a new region; Oceania. This includes New Guinea, Australia, Fiji, and many more including my country, Samoa. Samoa is a very small island somewhere between Australia and Hawaii. But, being smaller than most U.S. states doesn’t stop Samoa from having a big personality in their music. They include loads of percussion, strings, and strong vocals. The instument I researched for Samoa was the pate. This instrument is in the slit drum family because it is hollow with a slit down the side which makes for a hollow and woody sound. It can also have engravings that add a little texture to the sound. Although it was hard to find many resources for Oceanian music, it was fascinating to learn about a completely different culture that you don’t typically hear about in a textbook. The most interesting part to me was how they used their surroundings to create new types of music. For example, some countries have water music which is literally just slapping the water in a specific way to a specific beat to turn the ocean into your drumset. It’s so incredible to see how the techniques they use actually make water sound like precision. Overall, I think the world music projects are a great way for us to get a taste of other cultures through one of the most unique, diverse, and uniting arts around; music. And who knows, maybe I’ll be adding some Ethiopian, or Samoan, or Indian, or European or even Asian and South American music to my playlist sometime soon!

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